🌄 Avocet in Flight

Avocet in Flight

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🌄 Grizzly Bear, Ursus arctos horribilis; population about 1,500. Sedgewick County Zoo, Wichita, Kansas. Sartore: “This grizzly you see isn’t tame; he’s just hungry. My friends at the Sedgewick County Zoo in Wichita allowed me to paint off an exhibition cell with nontoxic white paint and then load in the bear. He stood in the center of the room hoping to get treats tossed in, and I shot through the bars. As soon as our shoot was over, we powerwashed the paint off the walls and floor. Mission accomplished.”
From RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

Grizzly Bear, Ursus arctos horribilis; population about 1,500. Sedgewick County Zoo, Wichita, Kansas. Sartore: “This grizzly you see isn’t tame; he’s just hungry. My friends at the Sedgewick County Zoo in Wichita allowed me to paint off an exhibition cell with nontoxic white paint and then load in the bear. He stood in the center of the room hoping to get treats tossed in, and I shot through the bars. As soon as our shoot was over, we powerwashed the paint off the walls and floor. Mission accomplished.”

From RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

🌄 California Condor, Gymnogyps californianus; population 356; Phoenix Zoo, Phoenix Arizona. Sartore: “This species nearly didn’t make it, but now there are more than 300 condors alive, and some of those birds fly free again. The bird you see here is known simply as Male #50. He flew in the wild for a time, until a collision with Arizona’s Navajo Bridge dislocated his right wing at the wrist. He’ll be an educational bird from now on—starting with this photograph.”
From  RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

California Condor, Gymnogyps californianus; population 356; Phoenix Zoo, Phoenix Arizona. Sartore: “This species nearly didn’t make it, but now there are more than 300 condors alive, and some of those birds fly free again. The bird you see here is known simply as Male #50. He flew in the wild for a time, until a collision with Arizona’s Navajo Bridge dislocated his right wing at the wrist. He’ll be an educational bird from now on—starting with this photograph.”

From  RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

🌄 Ocelot, Leopardus paradalis. Population 195, San Diego Zoo, San Diego, California. Sartore: “The key in photographing anything is having time and good access. In this case, we had access to the only ocelot I know of that is trained to walk on a leash, at the San Diego Zoo. Time was the real issue, though. Many of these animals will stand still only for food. The moment they get full, the shoot is over. We got eight minutes”
FromRARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

Ocelot, Leopardus paradalis. Population 195, San Diego Zoo, San Diego, California. Sartore: “The key in photographing anything is having time and good access. In this case, we had access to the only ocelot I know of that is trained to walk on a leash, at the San Diego Zoo. Time was the real issue, though. Many of these animals will stand still only for food. The moment they get full, the shoot is over. We got eight minutes”

FromRARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species by Joel Sartore

🌄 St. Andrew Beach Mouse, Peromyscus polionotus peninsular; population ≤ 6,000; Panama City, Florida. Sartore: “Beach mice are anthropomorphic—cute as can be and easy to love—unless you are a developer who is inconvenienced by preserving their habitat. But photographing them is almost as tricky as saving them. The mice never stop moving, and so quickly that I couldn’t follow them with my macro lens, let alone get a focus. My flash even had a hard time stopping them. Only when this mouse paused to groom did I get a moment to take a picture.”
From RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species

St. Andrew Beach Mouse, Peromyscus polionotus peninsular; population ≤ 6,000; Panama City, Florida. Sartore: “Beach mice are anthropomorphic—cute as can be and easy to love—unless you are a developer who is inconvenienced by preserving their habitat. But photographing them is almost as tricky as saving them. The mice never stop moving, and so quickly that I couldn’t follow them with my macro lens, let alone get a focus. My flash even had a hard time stopping them. Only when this mouse paused to groom did I get a moment to take a picture.”

From RARE: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species

🌄 A stork abruptly takes off from her nest in Strasbourg, France.
Photo: Frederick Florin / AFP / Getty Images (via SFGate)

A stork abruptly takes off from her nest in Strasbourg, France.

Photo: Frederick Florin / AFP / Getty Images (via SFGate)

🌄 One you lick, the other licks you: Afghan sisters have  a puppy and a popsicle outside their tent in a refugee camp in Kabul.
Photo: Dar Yasin / AP (via SFGate)

One you lick, the other licks you: Afghan sisters have a puppy and a popsicle outside their tent in a refugee camp in Kabul.

Photo: Dar Yasin / AP (via SFGate)

🌄 Circus performers tempt tigers at a zoo in Changzhou, China.
Photo: AP (via SFGate)

Circus performers tempt tigers at a zoo in Changzhou, China.

Photo: AP (via SFGate)