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Among the uses for old dungarees, add pooch papoose. (Backpacking cyclist, Berlin.)

PHOTO BY TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/GETTY IMAGES(via SFGate)

Among the uses for old dungarees, add pooch papoose. (Backpacking cyclist, Berlin.)

PHOTO BY TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/GETTY IMAGES(via SFGate)

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Sometimes you have an itch you just have to scratch - in this elephant’s case on a conveniently parked car. The VW Polo and its two terrified occupants found themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time as the giant ellie stooped down to rub itself against the vehicle’s roof and bonnet. The incredible images were taken by Armand Grobler, 21, a field guide and lodge manager, in Pilanesburg National Park, South Africa. The two passengers were shaken up, but escaped without injury - although the same could not be said for their car. But after giving itself a good scratch, the elephant continued on it’s way itch free.

Picture: Armand Grobler/Barcroft Media (via Pictures of the day: 6 August 2014 - Telegraph)

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Homer, an 18-week-old mastiff, is dressed as a bumblebee along with his owner, Eddyn Molden, 8, of Middletown, Va. during the judging for the Best Costumed Pet at the Frederick County Fair in Clear Brook, Va. Thursday, July 31, 2014. (AP Photo/ The Winchester Star, Jeff Taylor)

Jeff Taylor | AP (via Day in Pictures - The Sacramento Bee, Sacramento, California)

Homer, an 18-week-old mastiff, is dressed as a bumblebee along with his owner, Eddyn Molden, 8, of Middletown, Va. during the judging for the Best Costumed Pet at the Frederick County Fair in Clear Brook, Va. Thursday, July 31, 2014. (AP Photo/ The Winchester Star, Jeff Taylor)

Jeff Taylor | AP (via Day in Pictures - The Sacramento Bee, Sacramento, California)

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Top:

Many species of insects and spiders have mastered the arts of camouflage and mimicry. These macro photographs, taken by Singaporean photographer Nicky Bay, show the extraordinary lengths that insects and spiders will go to look like something else or simply disappear from view.

Ladybird mimic spider (Paraplectana sp.), viewed from the rear. This spider is red with black spots, similar to the markings found on ladybirds…

Picture: Science Photo Library / Rex Features

Bottom:

…This form of mimicry, in which a harmless species evolves the features of a harmful species as a deterrent against predators is known as Batesian mimicry. True ladybirds are unpalatable to predators.

Picture: Science Photo Library / Rex Features

(Via Telegraph.co.uk)


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montereybayaquarium:

Raising awareness, one image at a time

We know that beautiful images can move people in profound ways to act on behalf of animals.

National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to inspire people to protect wild animals by taking studio portraits of their kin at zoos and aquariums for his Photo Ark project.

The stark black and white backgrounds equalize the animals’ importance, whether the largest elephant or the smallest insect.

"By isolating animals on black and white backgrounds, we can look them directly in the eye and quickly see that these creatures contain beauty, grace and intelligence. Perhaps some even hold the key to our very salvation," Joel says.

At the Aquarium

We had the honor of hosting Joel recently for two fun and frenetic days as he photographed birds, fish, cephalopods and invertebrates. Joel’s hardworking staff is busy processing thousands of images he shot here and elsewhere, but we’ll soon share more of ours — plus what it’s like to work with Joel, a dozen aquarists, two other photographers and 30 critters parading in and out of one room.

In the meantime please support Joel by liking his Facebook page. To date Joel has documented nearly 4,000 animals for the Photo Ark and won’t stop until he gets them all — and you can help!

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A colourful and rare bee-eater and its mate have made their summer home on National Trust land on the Isle of Wight. Rarely seen on British shores, the colourful birds have nested on the island, with the Trust providing 24-hour surveillance to protect the bird’s eggs from potential theives

Picture: DIGITAL SOUTH (via Pictures of the day: 29 July 2014 - Telegraph)

A colourful and rare bee-eater and its mate have made their summer home on National Trust land on the Isle of Wight. Rarely seen on British shores, the colourful birds have nested on the island, with the Trust providing 24-hour surveillance to protect the bird’s eggs from potential theives

Picture: DIGITAL SOUTH (via Pictures of the day: 29 July 2014 - Telegraph)

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This female octopus spent four and one-half years brooding her eggs on a ledge near the bottom of Monterey Canyon, about 1,400 meters (4,600 feet) below the ocean surface. This photograph was taken in Fall 2007, about seven months after she laid her eggs. (click link at end for full story)



This photograph, taken in October 2011, shows the empty egg cases of an octopus that brooded her eggs for four and one half years in Monterey Canyon. Because the young octopus in these eggs had so long to develop, they were able to swim and hunt soon after hatching, which increased their odds of survival. Photo: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquarium



This photograph shows the same female octopus as in the previous photos as she appeared in September 2011, just before her eggs hatched. Photo: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquariam

Photos: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquariam R (via Octopus mom’s incredible record: 53 months with eggs in Monterey Bay - SFGate)

This female octopus spent four and one-half years brooding her eggs on a ledge near the bottom of Monterey Canyon, about 1,400 meters (4,600 feet) below the ocean surface. This photograph was taken in Fall 2007, about seven months after she laid her eggs. (click link at end for full story)

This photograph, taken in October 2011, shows the empty egg cases of an octopus that brooded her eggs for four and one half years in Monterey Canyon.

This photograph, taken in October 2011, shows the empty egg cases of an octopus that brooded her eggs for four and one half years in Monterey Canyon. Because the young octopus in these eggs had so long to develop, they were able to swim and hunt soon after hatching, which increased their odds of survival. Photo: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquarium

This photograph shows the same female octopus as in the previous photos as she appeared in September 2011, just before her eggs hatched. Photo: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquariam

This photograph shows the same female octopus as in the previous photos as she appeared in September 2011, just before her eggs hatched. Photo: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquariam

Photos: Courtesy Monterey Bay Aquariam R (via Octopus mom’s incredible record: 53 months with eggs in Monterey Bay - SFGate)

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As he approaches the grand old age of 28, ‘Patrick’ or ‘Paddy’ the common wombat is believed to be the oldest of his kind in captivity. The old timer, who lives at the Ballarat Wildlife Park in Australia, has now been included in a list by CNN of the best mascots from cities across the globe, alongside Knut the polar bear and a cat that runs a train station in Japan

Picture: David Caird/Newspix/REX (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

As he approaches the grand old age of 28, ‘Patrick’ or ‘Paddy’ the common wombat is believed to be the oldest of his kind in captivity. The old timer, who lives at the Ballarat Wildlife Park in Australia, has now been included in a list by CNN of the best mascots from cities across the globe, alongside Knut the polar bear and a cat that runs a train station in Japan

Picture: David Caird/Newspix/REX (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)