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Three-week-old baby sulcatta tortoises, which have been named Donatello, Raphael, Leonardo and Michelangelo, hitch a ride on the back of their mother Margaret at the Lake District Wild Life Park near Keswick. It’s the first time the wildlife park has successfully bred Africa’s largest tortoise.

Picture: Owen Humphreys/PA (via Pictures of the day: 16 October 2014 - Telegraph)

Three-week-old baby sulcatta tortoises, which have been named Donatello, Raphael, Leonardo and Michelangelo, hitch a ride on the back of their mother Margaret at the Lake District Wild Life Park near Keswick. It’s the first time the wildlife park has successfully bred Africa’s largest tortoise.

Picture: Owen Humphreys/PA (via Pictures of the day: 16 October 2014 - Telegraph)

🌄 bthny:

bthny:

ATTN North Jersey/NYC/Philly/etc.: My grandmother is no longer able to care for her two beagles and we desperately need to find a new home for them. Harpo (L) will curl up next to you for pets as soon as you sit down and Joey (R) is more energetic and playful. They are a bit senior (10 and 14 - I think that Harpo is older but could be wrong about that) and sweethearts in their own unique ways. Both are healthy and just had full dental work done. Because they are bonded and have been living together after my grandmother rescued them separately years ago, we’d love to see them remain together. For more information, please contact FernDog Rescue at ferndogadoptions@gmail.com or Verona Animal Hospital at 973-239-1881/www.vahmah.com.

Thank you to everyone who has shared so far. My grandmother asked about her dogs last night and was relieved to hear about our efforts to find them a new home.
I am heartbroken to think about how sad and scared they must be in their temporary home at the vet, though I’m sure that the staff there is providing excellent care. There is no way that I or anybody else in my family can take them in; because we are the type of people who prefer dogs to humans this is really hard for all of us.
Please continue to share. They would do great in a home with older children (10 and over, I’d say) and have lived with other dogs and a cat before. 

bthny:

bthny:

ATTN North Jersey/NYC/Philly/etc.: My grandmother is no longer able to care for her two beagles and we desperately need to find a new home for them. Harpo (L) will curl up next to you for pets as soon as you sit down and Joey (R) is more energetic and playful. They are a bit senior (10 and 14 - I think that Harpo is older but could be wrong about that) and sweethearts in their own unique ways. Both are healthy and just had full dental work done. Because they are bonded and have been living together after my grandmother rescued them separately years ago, we’d love to see them remain together. For more information, please contact FernDog Rescue at ferndogadoptions@gmail.com or Verona Animal Hospital at 973-239-1881/www.vahmah.com.

Thank you to everyone who has shared so far. My grandmother asked about her dogs last night and was relieved to hear about our efforts to find them a new home.

I am heartbroken to think about how sad and scared they must be in their temporary home at the vet, though I’m sure that the staff there is providing excellent care. There is no way that I or anybody else in my family can take them in; because we are the type of people who prefer dogs to humans this is really hard for all of us.

Please continue to share. They would do great in a home with older children (10 and over, I’d say) and have lived with other dogs and a cat before. 

🌄 
A baby manatee approaches its mothers for a peck on the cheek. The bond between calves and their mothers is the closest in manatee families and can last up to two years. Photographer Carol Grant captured the intimate moments on camera at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.

Picture: Carol Grant/Caters News (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

A baby manatee approaches its mothers for a peck on the cheek. The bond between calves and their mothers is the closest in manatee families and can last up to two years. Photographer Carol Grant captured the intimate moments on camera at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.

Picture: Carol Grant/Caters News (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

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fatchance:

Clark’s nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana), gathering limber pine seeds (Pinus flexilis), near the Alfa Fia Tank, Coconino National Forest, Arizona. Nutcrackers are large birds, a little bigger than jays. 

The bottom photo shows the bird’s crop full of seeds. They will hide thousands of pine seeds each season, and somehow maintain remarkably accurate mental maps of their caches’ locations. The few seeds they forget become an important mechanism for starts of new pine seedlings.

Etymology note: A very straightforward derivation for the genus, from Latin nucis for nut, and frangere, meaning to break (and also the root of the words fragment and fraction).

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Category: Invertebrates You have been warned Alex Mustard (United Kingdom)
When Alex went diving in the Lembeh Strait in North Sulawesi, he was on a mission to celebrate the smaller sea creatures. Equipped with a new high-magnification lens, he encountered this variable neon nudibranch (sea slug) crawling across the seabed. Less than 2 centimetres (an inch) long, with green gills on its back and orange mouthparts, it has orange, feather-like rhinophores that it uses to ‘smell’ out its prey – sea squirts. It incorporates distasteful chemicals from the sea squirts’ skin into a slimy mucus and uses neon colours to warn predators that it tastes bad. Alex wanted an eye-level view of this unforgettable mollusc. But even with a small aperture, it was a challenge: there was little depth of field (amount in focus) and the subject was moving – and a slug’s pace under magnification is surprisingly fast.

Picture: Alex Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 (via Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 - Telegraph)

Category: Invertebrates
You have been warned
Alex Mustard (United Kingdom)

When Alex went diving in the Lembeh Strait in North Sulawesi, he was on a mission to celebrate the smaller sea creatures. Equipped with a new high-magnification lens, he encountered this variable neon nudibranch (sea slug) crawling across the seabed. Less than 2 centimetres (an inch) long, with green gills on its back and orange mouthparts, it has orange, feather-like rhinophores that it uses to ‘smell’ out its prey – sea squirts. It incorporates distasteful chemicals from the sea squirts’ skin into a slimy mucus and uses neon colours to warn predators that it tastes bad. Alex wanted an eye-level view of this unforgettable mollusc. But even with a small aperture, it was a challenge: there was little depth of field (amount in focus) and the subject was moving – and a slug’s pace under magnification is surprisingly fast.

Picture: Alex Mustard/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 (via Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 - Telegraph)

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Dressed to impress: A cow in a hat waits for judging in an exhibition hall on the opening day of the Golden Autumn agricultural exhibition at the VDNH (Exhibition of Achievements of National Economy) multifunctional exhibition centre in Moscow, Russia

Picture: MAXIM SHIPENKOV/EPA (via Pictures of the day: 9 October 2014 - Telegraph)

Dressed to impress: A cow in a hat waits for judging in an exhibition hall on the opening day of the Golden Autumn agricultural exhibition at the VDNH (Exhibition of Achievements of National Economy) multifunctional exhibition centre in Moscow, Russia

Picture: MAXIM SHIPENKOV/EPA (via Pictures of the day: 9 October 2014 - Telegraph)